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Brian Klein Brian Klein

Welcome to Humanastory. A community created with one goal in mind - Human Companionship.

Our core belief is a simple one; everyone has a story, everyone is the story. Your experiences in life define who you are and what choices you will make.

What if you could share what you have learned from the experience with someone just beginning that same journey. What would you say to them?

We are the story of humanity, one person at a time.

Brian Klein Brian Klein

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Found 39 results

  1. Brian Klein

    Mysterious Egg

    What a Breakout Monster Egg looks like!

    © Humanastory

  2. Brian Klein

    Lupinus Arizonicus

    Lupinus arizonicus is a flowering plant in the family Fabaceae, native to the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts, where it can be found growing in open places and sandy washes below 1,100 metres elevation.

    © Humanastory

  3. A plant indigenous to the Sonoran Desert and Chihuahuan Desert in the Southwestern United States, and northern Mexico. Ocotillo is not a real cactus.

    © Humanastory

  4. Brian Klein

    Desert Rock

    A desert rock.

    © Humanastory

  5. Brian Klein

    Rusty Barrel

    An old rusty barrel

    © Humanastory

  6. Brian Klein

    Ocotillo Desert

    A desert is a barren area of landscape where little precipitation occurs and, consequently, living conditions are hostile for plant and animal life. The lack of vegetation exposes the unprotected surface of the ground to the processes of denudation. About one-third of the land surface of the world is arid or semi-arid. This includes much of the polar regions where little precipitation occurs and which are sometimes called polar deserts or "cold deserts". Deserts can be classified by the amount of precipitation that falls, by the temperature that prevails, by the causes of desertification or by their geographical location.

    © Humanastory

  7. Brian Klein

    Old Wagon

    The first stagecoach route that transported mail to the far west. The route covered 600 miles from St. Louis, Missouri to San Francisco, California. Prior to this, the mail was brought by ship through the Gulf of Mexico, across Panama by truck and again by ship up to California. The route was in operation from 1857-1861. Founded by John W. Butterfield and his associate William G. Fargo (better known as Wells Fargo), among others. Operations began when they won the coveted post office contract in 1857. They successfully delivered mail until the onset of the American Civil War in 1861. unfortunately, Due to debts owed by Butterfield to Fargo, he lost his stake in the company. However, Wells Fargo continued and grew his company to the namesake of banks that it is today.

    © Humanastory

  8. Ocotillo is located on a site that originally sat on the edge of ancient Lake Cahuilla and is the traditional territory of the Kumeyaay. The town originated as a retirement community. The post office was opened in 1957. In March 2012, a museum, the Imperial Valley Desert Museum opened in Ocotillo after many years of fundraising and construction.

    © Humanastory

  9. While marching to the conquest and occupation of California during the Mexican War, a detachment of 1st U.S. Dragoons, under the command of Brig. Gen. Stephen W. Kearny, was met on this site by native California lancers under, the command of Gen. Andres Pico. In this battle, fought on December 6, 1846, severe losses were incurred by the American forces. The native Californians withdrew after Kearny had rallied his men on the field. Gallant action on the part of both forces characterized the battle of San Pasqual, one of the significant actions during the Mexican War of 1846-1848.

    © Humanastory

  10. Palomar Mountain is a mountain ridge in the Peninsular Ranges in northern San Diego County. It is famous as the location of the Palomar Observatory and Hale Telescope, and known for the Palomar Mountain State Park.

    © Humanastory

  11. Palomar Mountain is a mountain ridge in the Peninsular Ranges in northern San Diego County. It is famous as the location of the Palomar Observatory and Hale Telescope, and known for the Palomar Mountain State Park.

    © Humanastory

  12. Palomar Mountain is a mountain ridge in the Peninsular Ranges in northern San Diego County. It is famous as the location of the Palomar Observatory and Hale Telescope, and known for the Palomar Mountain State Park.

    © Humanastory

  13. Palomar Mountain is a mountain ridge in the Peninsular Ranges in northern San Diego County. It is famous as the location of the Palomar Observatory and Hale Telescope, and known for the Palomar Mountain State Park.

    © Humanastory

  14. Palomar Mountain is a mountain ridge in the Peninsular Ranges in northern San Diego County. It is famous as the location of the Palomar Observatory and Hale Telescope, and known for the Palomar Mountain State Park.

    © Humanastory

  15. Brian Klein

    Bridge

    A typical bridge created by the military in 1842

    © Humanastory

  16. Brian Klein

    Candle Pot

    This was a generic candle creating pot used by the troops of the Mexican American War of 1842

    © Humanastory

  17. Brian Klein

    Rattle Warming

    Crotalus oreganus (often called the Western Rattlesnake) is the most common venomous snake in California, and is comprised of three subspecies: Crotalus oreganus helleri, Crotalus oreganus lutosus, and Crotalus oreganus oreganus. These snakes are found from sea level to an altitude of 8,200 ft

    © Humanastory

  18. Two men who would feature in Santa Clarita Valley history — as allies — held opposing loyalties during the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848. Both Andrés Pico (as in Pico Canyon) and Edward F. "Ned" Beale (Beale's Cut, Tejon Ranch) played significant roles in the December 1846 Battle of San Pasqual, fought in proximity to an active Kumeyaay Indian village near the present city of Escondido in San Diego County. Bedrock mortars are found throughout the hills surrounding the battlefield, where a California State Historic Park visitors center tells the story of the battle and the broader war (in English and Spanish) and of the indigenous Kumeyaay people. Pico, commander of Mexican forces in California and brother of the governor, routed the remnants of Stephen W. Kearny's Army of the West, who now numbered only 100 men after Kearny (pronounded "Carney") sent most of his troops home two months earlier in the mistaken belief the war was over. It was a costly error that led to one of the war's bloodiest battles. With wet gunpowder as a rainy night dissolved into a misty morning, Kearny's weary troops were no match for Pico's men who, expert in the use of the lariat and lance from capturing grizzly bears for bull-and-bear fights, used the same skills to dismount and dispatch the Americans. Kearny lost either 21 or 22 men, depending on the source, including those who later succumbed to their wounds, versus maybe one casualty for Pico. Kearny himself was wounded in the battle, as was the despised Archibald Gillespie, whose ruthlessness at Los Angeles had provoked the latest Californio uprising. (If not for Gillespie, Kearny might have been right: the war might have been over.) The scout Alexander Godey and two other Americans were captured, as was one soldier on Pico's side. Enter midshipman Ned Beale, who with a contingent of about 20 fighting men and a heavy gun had been sent just prior to the battle by Commodore Robert Stockton, commander of the U.S. Navy at San Diego, to assist Kearny. Beale negotiated a prisoner exchange with Pico (who refused to let Godey go). This was probably the first time Beale and Pico met. Kearny was determined to press on to San Diego, just 35 miles distant. Pico was equally determined to stop him. Beale carried a message through enemy lines from Kearny to Stockton soliciting reinforcements. The escapade, which Beale made with his Delaware Indian man-servant and the scout Kit Carson, whom Kearny had controversially enlisted, soon achieved legendary proportions as the party reportedly walked barefoot through prickly pear cactus and crawled on their bellies within 20 yards of enemy positions. It also enshrined Beale as the "Hero of San Pasqual." The message received, Stockton sent reinforcements, and a month later Pico capitulated to U.S. Gen. John Fremont at Cahuenga, across the street from today's Universal City.

    © Humanastory

  19. Brian Klein

    San Pasqual Wall

    San Pasqual Battlefield State Historic Park, east of Escondido, honors the soldiers who fought in the battle between the U.S. and Californio forces on December 6, 1846 in the midst of the Mexican-American War. Generals Stephen Kearny and Andrés Pico both claimed victory. The battle was only one of the military encounters in California in the war, but it proved to be the bloodiest and most controversial as to the outcome. The park has been set aside, not as a monument to war, but as a reminder of the human ideals, actions and passions that can drive nations to bloodshed.

    © Humanastory

  20. Brian Klein

    Adobe Building

    Adobe bricks are rectangular prisms small enough that they can quickly air dry individually without cracking. They can be subsequently assembled, with the application of adobe mud to bond the individual bricks into a structure. There is no standard size, with substantial variations over the years and in different regions. In some areas a popular size measured 8 by 4 by 12 inches (20 cm × 10 cm × 30 cm) weighing about 25 pounds (11 kg); in other contexts the size is 10 by 4 by 14 inches (25 cm × 10 cm × 36 cm) weighing about 35 pounds (16 kg).

    © Humanastory

  21. Brian Klein

    M1841 Cannon

    The M1841 6-pounder field gun was a bronze smoothbore muzzle-loading cannon that was adopted by the United States Army in 1841 and used from the Mexican–American War to the American Civil War. It fired a 6.1 lb (2.8 kg) round shot up to a distance of 1,523 yd (1,393 m) at 5° elevation. It could also fire canister shot and spherical case shot. The cannon proved very effective when employed by light artillery units during the Mexican–American War.

    © Humanastory

  22. Brian Klein

    Road Less Traveled

    The road less traveled is sometimes the road worth traveling; it's ever winding path of asphalt covered only by the gentle patter of rain water dripping from the trees, quietly beckons to slow down and notice what you are passing. In life, we are given so many opportunities to notice something other then ourselves; this was one of those times.

    © Humanastory

  23. Brian Klein

    Glow of Amber

    As night falls, the dark cascades throughout the room; creeping, lurking. This cycle of life shows us all that death will eventually come; not even light is safe. However, even in darkness there is a hopeful glimmer of dimly-lit candle light, however grim, will always be there to guide us safely ashore bridging the ever widening chasm between the two cycles of life and death; in the end, it will be okay.

    © Humanastory

  24. Brian Klein

    Landscape [007]

    A landscape is the visible features of an area of land, its landforms, and how they integrate with natural or man-made features. A landscape includes the physical elements of geophysically defined landforms such as (ice-capped) mountains, hills, water bodies such as rivers, lakes, ponds and the sea, living elements of land cover including indigenous vegetation, human elements including different forms of land use, buildings, and structures, and transitory elements such as lighting and weather conditions. Combining both their physical origins and the cultural overlay of human presence, often created over millennia, landscapes reflect a living synthesis of people and place that is vital to local and national identity. The character of a landscape helps define the self-image of the people who inhabit it and a sense of place that differentiates one region from other regions. It is the dynamic backdrop to people's lives. Landscape can be as varied as farmland, a landscape park or wilderness. The Earth has a vast range of landscapes, including the icy landscapes of polar regions, mountainous landscapes, vast arid desert landscapes, islands, and coastal landscapes, densely forested or wooded landscapes including past boreal forests and tropical rainforests, and agricultural landscapes of temperate and tropical regions. The activity of modifying the visible features of an area of land is referred to as landscaping.

    © Humanastory

  25. Brian Klein

    Landscape [001]

    A landscape is the visible features of an area of land, its landforms, and how they integrate with natural or man-made features. A landscape includes the physical elements of geophysically defined landforms such as (ice-capped) mountains, hills, water bodies such as rivers, lakes, ponds and the sea, living elements of land cover including indigenous vegetation, human elements including different forms of land use, buildings, and structures, and transitory elements such as lighting and weather conditions. Combining both their physical origins and the cultural overlay of human presence, often created over millennia, landscapes reflect a living synthesis of people and place that is vital to local and national identity. The character of a landscape helps define the self-image of the people who inhabit it and a sense of place that differentiates one region from other regions. It is the dynamic backdrop to people's lives. Landscape can be as varied as farmland, a landscape park or wilderness. The Earth has a vast range of landscapes, including the icy landscapes of polar regions, mountainous landscapes, vast arid desert landscapes, islands, and coastal landscapes, densely forested or wooded landscapes including past boreal forests and tropical rainforests, and agricultural landscapes of temperate and tropical regions. The activity of modifying the visible features of an area of land is referred to as landscaping.

    © Humanastory

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